Living Honorably at Harpeth Hall

Living Honorably at Harpeth Hall

Harpeth Hall educates young women to think critically, to lead confidently, and to live honorably.

Living honorably is more than a phrase in our mission statement, it is the cornerstone in how our students learn and grow at Harpeth Hall.

"It is the bedrock value," Armistead Lemon, Director of the Upper School, remarked at last week's Honor Assembly. "The value on which all else is built."

Harpeth Hall's annual Honor Assembly is a time for students to pledge to be responsible and honorable members of our school. This year, although the program took place virtually with students watching on screens throughout campus, this pledge brought the community together.

"A community founded on honor is a beautiful thing to witness," Ms. Lemon concluded in her remarks, "I believe that to live honorably is to make the hard right choice over the easy wrong one...The sum of all of these hard right choices is ultimately a life of integrity."

Following Ms. Lemon's welcome, Harpeth Hall Senior and President of the Honor Council, Maia Roark '21, stepped up to the podium. While she praised public acts of honor, Maia encouraged her fellow students to commit unseen acts of honor at school and in their daily lives. These acts are "the most valiant of all, because no one else is telling you how to act or what to do," she said.

She reminded her classmates that this year honor also means keeping the community healthy by wearing masks both on and off campus and following safety guidelines. "In the end, we will be stronger as a community if we can embrace our new challenges," she said. "We have a complicated year ahead of us, but we can persevere through adversity if we can find ways to support each other and work together."

After this year's Honor Council was sworn in, Judi O'Brien, Director of the Middle School, introduced eighth grader and member of the Honor Education Committee, Kiki Christopher '25. Kiki spoke of the importance of building trust through honor. "If you act dishonorably," she said, "it not only hurts yourself, but it hurts the whole community."

Following Kiki's speech, throughout campus students rose together to make the following promise: 

As a student of Harpeth Hall, I hereby pledge my full and hearty support to the Honor System. I pledge to be honest myself, and in order that the spirit and integrity of the Honor System may endure, I pledge that I will give no unauthorized assistance to other students. I will demonstrate my integrity in an honest and fair manner. In doing so, I fully commit to fostering an honest and respectful learning environment for my peers, my teachers, and myself.

"One of the things I love most about Harpeth Hall is that we are a school where girls learn to support each other and build each other up, relishing in each other's successes," Ms. O'Brien reflected in her remarks. "We all play an important role in making our school a place where everyone feels that they will be celebrated and treated with respect and dignity."