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Why a Girls' School

WHY CHOOSE A GIRLS' SCHOOL?

National research and years of experience tell us that adolescent and teenage girls thrive in a single-gender environment. As a single-gender school, Harpeth Hall offers an academic and social environment where students can take risks, discuss issues pertinent to young women, and develop a positive self-awareness.

Need more reasons? Consider these 8 reasons:

1. Girls put academics first.
Girls' schools create a culture of achievement where a girl's accomplishments are what matters—where what she believes in and how she puts her beliefs into action are more important than what she wears to school. More than 80 percent of girls' school graduates consider their academic performance highly successful compared to 75 percent of women from coed schools. On the intellectual front, 60 percent of women from girls' schools report self-confidence, compared to 54 percent from coed schools.
 
2. Girls are more confident in the STEM subjects.
(Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
100 percent of Harpeth Hall girls complete four years of math, and 100 percent complete three years of science (twice the national average).  At the start of college, girls' school graduates rate their confidence in their abilities in math and in computer skills more than 10 percent higher than do their coed counterparts, and they are three times more likely than women graduates of coed schools to consider pursuing a career in engineering. Additionally, 13 percent intend to major in math or science—significantly more than their counterparts from coed schools (2 percent for females).
 
3. Girls are prepared for college.
100 percent of Harpeth Hall graduates attend and thrive at four-year colleges or universities.
Ninety-three percent of recent girls' school graduates said they were very or extremely satisfied with how their schools prepared them for college. Additionally, more girls' school graduates consider college a stepping stone to graduate school (71 percent vs. 66 percent from coed schools).
 
4. Girls are community-minded and politically active.
100 percent of Harpeth Hall girls voluntarily participate in community service and annually contribute more than 20,000 hours of service. At the start of college, girls' school graduates rate their political engagement more than 10 percent higher than their coed peers and report they are more likely to have a political discussion in class and with friends, and find it essential to keep up with the political scene.
 
5. Girls are confident.
Harpeth Hall's mission is to teach girls to think critically, to lead confidently, and to live honorably. Self-confidence is the key to turning skills and knowledge into success. Eighty-two  percent of recent girls' school graduates say they were very or extremely satisfied with how well their schools instilled self-confidence.
 
6. Girls are leaders.
At Harpeth Hall, all girls can be leaders and all leaders are girls. Leadership is an acquired skill. Eighty-four percent of recent girls' school graduates give their schools top marks for providing leadership opportunities. Additionally, 93 percent agreed that girls' schools provide greater leadership opportunities than coed schools and 80 percent had held leadership positions since graduating from high school.
 
7. Girls have higher aspirations and greater motivation.
When asked what motivates them, 94.9 percent of students at all-girls schools (compared to 93.5 percent of girls at coed independent schools and 86.7 percent of girls at coed public schools) agree or strongly agree they are motivated by their desire to succeed outside of school and 83.9 percent by their desire to learn (compared to 81.0 percent of girls at coed independent schools and 66.1 percent of girls at coed public schools).

8. Showing greater gains on core academic and life skills.
Almost 95 percent of girls' school students report their work has contributed to successfully reading and understanding challenging materials, which compares favorably to girls at coed independent schools (92.5 percent) and coed public schools (76.6 percent).

Sources for data:
2013 Steeped in Learning: The Student Experience at All-Girls Schools, administered by Indiana University’s Center for Evaluation and Education Policy (CEEP),the High School Survey of Student Engagement (HSSSE); 2005 National Coalition of Girls' Schools Alumnae Survey; 2009 UCLA study of more than 20,000 freshmen college women, and 2000 NCGS study conducted by the Goodman Research Group of Cambridge, Massachusetts.
 
Memberships
National Coalition of Girls' Schools

Online School for Girls

Center for Spiritual and Ethical Education

GAINS Network, virtual community connecting girls with STEM resources and mentors

National Association of Independent Schools